Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Converting Numbers Into Words Using JavaScript

Lots of programming involves calculations with numbers, and  you can easily format numbers for display by adding commas, decimals, negative signs, and other appropriate characters depending on the kind of number it is. But youre not always presenting your results as part of a mathematical equation. The Web for the general user is more about words than it is about numbers, so sometimes a number displayed as a number isnt appropriate. In this case, you need the equivalent of the number in words, not in numerals. This is where you can  run into difficulties. How do you convert  the numeric  results of your calculations when you need the number displayed in words? Converting a number into words isnt exactly the most straightforward of tasks, but it can be done using JavaScript that isnt too complex. JavaScript to Convert Numbers Into Words If you want to be able to do these conversions on your site,  you will need a JavaScript code that can do the conversion for you. The simplest way to do this is to use the code below; just select the code and copy it into a file called toword.js. // Convert numbers to words// copyright 25th July 2006, by Stephen Chapman http://javascript.about.com// permission to use this Javascript on your web page is granted// provided that all of the code (including this copyright notice) is// used exactly as shown (you can change the numbering system if you wish) // American Numbering Systemvar th [,thousand,million, billion,trillion];// uncomment this line for English Number System// var th [,thousand,million, milliard,billion]; var dg [zero,one,two,three,four,five,six,seven,eight,nine]; var tn [ten,eleven,twelve,thirteen, fourteen,fifteen,sixteen,seventeen,eighteen,nineteen]; var tw [twenty,thirty,forty,fifty,sixty,seventy,eighty,ninety]; function toWords(s){s s.toString(); s s.replace(/[\, ]/g,); if (s ! parseFloat(s)) return not a number; var x s.indexOf(.); if (x -1) x s.length; if (x 15) return too big; var n s.split(); var str ; var sk 0; for (var i0; i x; i) {if((x-i)%32) {if (n[i] 1) {str tn[Number(n[i1])] ; i; sk1;}else if (n[i]!0) {str tw[n[i]-2] ;sk1;}} else if (n[i]!0) {str dg[n[i]] ; if ((x-i)%30) str hundred ;sk1;} if ((x-i)%31) {if (sk)str th[(x-i-1)/3] ;sk0;}} if (x ! s.length) {var y s.length; str point ; for (var ix1; istr.replace(/\s/g, );} Next,  link the script into the head of your page using the following code: var words toWords(num); The final step is to call the script to perform the conversion to words for you. To get a number converted to words you just need to call the function passing it the number you want to convert and the corresponding words will be returned. Numbers to Words Limitations Note that this function can convert numbers as big as 999,999,999,999,999 into words and  with as many decimal places as you like. If you try to convert a number bigger than that it will return too big. Numbers, commas, spaces, and a single period for the decimal point are the only acceptable characters that can be used for the number being converted. If it contains anything beyond these characters, it will return not a number. Negative Numbers If you want to convert negative numbers of currency values to words you should remove those symbols from the number first and convert those to words separately.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau Free Essays

Civil Disobedience was written by Henry David Thoreau. The Letter From A Birmingham Jail was written by Martin Luther King Jr. They both had similarities and differences. We will write a custom essay sample on Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau or any similar topic only for you Order Now There were injustices that were done wrong to each of them by others in the society in which they both lived. The injustices and civil disobedience they incurred should never happen to anyone. Henry David Thoreau spoke in an emotional tone in his essay â€Å"Civil Disobedience. † The emotional part of his essay of Civil Disobedience is that he wants the people to speak up about what type of government they would want to have. Another emotional part was when he started to tell the people to stop paying their taxes so that if the government doesn’t get what they want then maybe they will reform and change their ways. Most of the people are afraid of the government and what the government will do to them and their property if someone disobeys their orders. The government has the right to take their property away from them. The government lets them keep their property if the people listen and obey what they say. The people feel that the government is protecting their rights. Thoreau want the people to rebel against the government and revolutionize together because they are treated like slaves and subjected to military law. People want a better government but they won’t do anything to correct the situation. They always think someone else will do something but no one ever does so nothing ever changes. It is very hard to change the minds of people who support the government the way it is. Men are afraid it will make things much worse for them if they go against the government even if they know they are right and the government is wrong. Thoreau says, â€Å"If you think you are right in your opinion then you are the majority and stand up for your rights against the government. Stop giving the government what it wants and maybe the government will reform to what the people want. † He wants people to stand up for their rights and risk being put in jail. People should join together as one to put an end to the injustices they have had to deal with from the government. People need to elect the right person to make changes in the government. In Henry David Thoreau’s â€Å"Civil Disobedience†, he makes an ethical appeal to he people because he thinks it is better not to have a government at all and that the American government makes more problems instead of making things better. Although not all is wrong, certain things need changing. The government doesn’t care about the people, it just wants them to do what they tell you to do, like to go to war and serve in the army whether you want to or not and pay taxes to the church whether you attend church or not. If the laws are not obeyed by the people and the people don’t do as the government tells them to do then the government would put you in jail for an undetermined amount of time. Thoreau thinks the constitution is evil and wants to make things better by petitioning the people because he wants to have a better place to live in. He also is saying that being in jail is better than obeying the government and paying taxes and going to war. When you are in jail you get everything you need like free room and board and three meals a day, but it would all just be a waste of time because nothing would change. People need to stand up for their rights and what they believe in if they want things to change. Martin Luther King Jr wrote the â€Å"Letter From A Birmingham Jail†. In his essay he said many strongly spoken emotional appeals. He tries to appeal to the people about the segregation of black people when he says, â€Å"When you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year old daughter why she can’t go the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Fun-town is closed to colored children. † This quote has a lot of meaning to the colored people. This is racism and it is wrong and it is an injustice that the colored people had to face and deal with for many, many years. Martin Luther King Jr loves the church and wants the blacks to be included in everything that white people are. He was grateful to one reverend for including the black people in a Sunday service in a non-segregated way because it was the right thing to do. Segregation has been an injustice that many people have had to deal with for too many years. An ethical appeal that Martin Luther King Jr. was arguing about were the injustices that colored people face each day of their lives. He was arguing about what was right and what was wrong. He wanted people to realize that they were â€Å"victims of a broken promise†. They were promised that racial signs would be removed but they were not. He was using a non-violent direct action protest and got arrested for it because the whites kept the black people out of everything. The black people were being segregated and not allowed the same rights and courtesies as the white people. Colored people had a separate bathroom than the white people. Colored people couldn’t sit at the lunch counter or ride in the front of a bus. Rosa Parks took a stand and protested in a non-violent way. She decided one day to sit in the front of the bus and was arrested. Martin Luther King Jr. says that â€Å"non-violent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue†. Negro leaders have tried to speak about these issues with white officials but nothing has changed. This is why Rosa Parks took a stand for what she believed in and also why Martin Luther King Jr. ook a stand for his rights by going on a march from Montgomery to Birmingham, Alabama. Martin Luther King Jr. also states that â€Å"A just law is a man-made code that squares with moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law†. In his essay he thanks one Reverend for allowing black people into his church on a non-segregated basis. This was just a small step in their actions to change the way people think because they have suffered these injustices for way too many years. Both Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King Jr. ave made excellent points in their essays about the injustices that have been inflicted upon them in their society. They both have had to deal with many injustices and a lot of people whose wrong doings toward them have made their society a bad place in which to live. Each person was seeking ways to make their society a better place to live in, now and in the future. They both hope that people will see that they way they are being treated is wrong and will stand up for what is right instead of going along with what is wrong. How to cite Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau, Papers

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Catcher In The Rye Symbolism Essay Example For Students

Catcher In The Rye Symbolism Essay The Catcher in the Rye, by JD Salinger, is a display of characters and incidents portrayed through the eyes of an adolscent. Holden Caulfield, the main character has been revealed in the first person view in a unique narrative of a teenage boy who forms a transition into adulthood. Holden perceives the world as an evil and corrupt place where there is no purity and that individuals in the world acquire a trait known as phony. Throughout the novel, Holden Caulfield refers to the conditions of the society he lives in and deals with his internal affairs and his extrinsic circumstances. The setting of the book which is varied, brings the reader to the conclusion that it takes place in a psycotherapy session. Knowing this information, allows the reader to understand thiat his story is being stated through Holdens mind, which is essential to know due to the fact that Holden may not provide factual information based on his observations and assumptions towards society. Though Holden opposes against societys phonies, he is in need of compassion and friendship. An example of Holdens need for fellowship is when he says, I sort of miss everybody I told you about. Even old Stradlater and Ackley, for instance. I think I miss even that goddam Maurice. Despite Holdens hatred towards society, he can be considered sane for the reason that he does stand against the false standards and hypocrisy society accepts. Although Holden would probably like to accept the fact that the world is an easeful place, he cannot pretend that his society is worthwhile. Throughout the book, Holden seemed to be lagged behnd in his emotions and his reactions to others. Allie, who is Holdens younger brother died of leukemia at a younger age and has seemed to have forged a large mark in Holdens life emotionally. From the day that Allie died, it was the beginning of Holdens rejection of society and the definite vision of Allie destroyed. Holden wants to connect with Allie and does so by wearing on a red hunting hat which is a connection to his brothers red hair and keeps him dry in the storm. The cap allows him to feel ostracized from society and keeps Allies memory retained. Asecond form of Allies connection to him is the catchers mitt, which is a baseball mitt and a symbol of the title known as the Cathcher in the Rye. The catchers mitt can signify that Allie is Holdens catcher, keeping him safe. Though Holden looks back over the loss of his brother Allie, it seems that Salinger has brought back the characteristics and qualities into a sibling of Holdens known as Phoebe. Holden now knows that he must become the catcher in the rye. He feels that he has a responsibility upon saving the children from falling off the cliff and into losing their innocence. Holden wants to protect the vulnerable and from being corrupted by society as they grow up. Holden views himself as vulnerable at times too, when he look at the ducks and thinks about himself that he has no direction in life and that it should remain constant. Though Holden appears to be attempting his unusual task as being the catcher in the rye, he understands that his dream is unrealistic. When Holden is watching his sister, Phoebe, on the carrousel, he understands accepts the reality of life. He observes Phoebe, on the carrousel whoch is adulthood and considers the horse as faith, hope and love and finally the gold ring which is the end of the cliff, to which the closer ypu get, the closer you fall. According to the novel, I thought that the ending was ironic because Caulfield wanted to be the catcher but he was the one really falling. This is implied to when he feels like hes stepping into oblivion every time he steps off of a curb near the end. .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .postImageUrl , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:hover , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:visited , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:active { border:0!important; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:active , .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926 .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .uc1c44e7c38c3d341e841b1cf2eebb926:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Reality of the poem EssayHis sister catches him symbolically by showing him how how much she loved him when she shows up at the museum with her suitcase. He knows that he cannot take her with him out West, but he cannot walk away from her either. Eventually, Holden does go home. His lifestyle on the streets have brought him dissatisfaction and admitting his dependence on his family. Holden feels better about the outlook on life and also is optimistic about the coming school year. In my theory, I feel that the catcher of the ryewas Phoebe and that the person she caught was Holden.

Sunday, March 22, 2020

Haroldo de Campos The Ethics and Poetics of Transcreation Essay Example

Haroldo de Campos: The Ethics and Poetics of Transcreation Essay Haroldo de Campos: The Ethics and Poetics of Transcreation This paper discusses the Brazilian theory and practice of translation as transcreation, set in motion in the 1950s by the Neograndes group of concrete poets (namely the late Haroldo de Campos, his brother Augusto and Dcio Pignateri), in light of two of the most challenging cultural approaches to translation in the late 1990s: Lawrence Venutis alignment with an ethics of difference in translation (1997), and Henri Meschonnicss call for a poetics of translating (1999). Following Venutis lead that minority situations redefine what constitutes thedomestic and theforeign, the concept of transcreation will be analyzed as a forcible junction of a European metaphysics of translation that displaces the original (Benjamin, Derrida) and an indigenous anthropophagic tradition, updated by the modernist Oswald de Andrade as the absorption of the sacred [Western colonial] enemy. In Haroldo de Camposs writings, however, the indebtedness to primitive traditions and art forms is matched with the recovery of a creolized Iberian baroque. Furthermore, both are but parcels of a universal poetical legacy that needs to be expropriated and appropriated through translation in order to bring Brazilian cultural productions to the fore of a poetics of modernity that is basically construed through Western parameters, catapulting Brazilian concretism to its visionary role in the post-industrial technological era. Haroldo de Campos anchors the poetics of concretism in the avant-garde experiments of authors such as Mallarm, Pound and Joyce. Mallarms A Throw of Dice (1897) is seen as the precursor of the verbi-voco-visual experiments of the concrete poets, where structural elements such as rhythm and (typographical) spatiality are privileged over ve

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Free Essays on Frantz Fannon

Frantz Fanon Fanon writes about decolonization in both Africa and in South America. The process of decolonization in his mind is a violent process. Decolonization is in also an issue of race because in the countries which are colonized by the westerners the colonized nations are of a different race. This also fuels the fire of violence in the colonized nations. The European nations who colonized the African nations did so with an iron fist. They ruled the people using fear and punishment. This use of fear and violence is what the native people used to get rid of the foreigners. Fighting for their own land the native people will fight to the end because that is all they have to stand for. In the colonizing efforts all native practices were abolished and in this the people find themselves more connected to their land. The violence which has held the native people back is what is going to propel them into independence. The colonist bourgeoisie were the people who ran the colonies. The homes and businesses were taken over by the native middle class after the decolonization. This was a good thing for the native people but Fanon writes how this also restricted the people from doing other things. For example he speaks about South America and how it was turned into a tourist destination during the time of colonization. After the people fought for their freedom the native bourgeoisie took over the businesses and were forced to continue the tourist business. The colonized nations have little ability to move on and create new and profitable businesses. This is not helpful for the rest of the nation or country all of the lower class. These people don’t benefit from the decolonization and Fanon speaks on how the only people to benefit from the decolonization effort are the top five percent of the population. Another problem faced by the African nations was that 98 percent of the people were illiterate. This raises questio... Free Essays on Frantz Fannon Free Essays on Frantz Fannon Frantz Fanon Fanon writes about decolonization in both Africa and in South America. The process of decolonization in his mind is a violent process. Decolonization is in also an issue of race because in the countries which are colonized by the westerners the colonized nations are of a different race. This also fuels the fire of violence in the colonized nations. The European nations who colonized the African nations did so with an iron fist. They ruled the people using fear and punishment. This use of fear and violence is what the native people used to get rid of the foreigners. Fighting for their own land the native people will fight to the end because that is all they have to stand for. In the colonizing efforts all native practices were abolished and in this the people find themselves more connected to their land. The violence which has held the native people back is what is going to propel them into independence. The colonist bourgeoisie were the people who ran the colonies. The homes and businesses were taken over by the native middle class after the decolonization. This was a good thing for the native people but Fanon writes how this also restricted the people from doing other things. For example he speaks about South America and how it was turned into a tourist destination during the time of colonization. After the people fought for their freedom the native bourgeoisie took over the businesses and were forced to continue the tourist business. The colonized nations have little ability to move on and create new and profitable businesses. This is not helpful for the rest of the nation or country all of the lower class. These people don’t benefit from the decolonization and Fanon speaks on how the only people to benefit from the decolonization effort are the top five percent of the population. Another problem faced by the African nations was that 98 percent of the people were illiterate. This raises questio...

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Baby talk Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words

Baby talk - Research Paper Example This paper presents an analysis of Baby talk. In particular, it presents 15 baby talk words from a chosen child named Firas who is aged 2 years and 5 months. Additionally, this paper presents a morphological, phonological and syntactic analysis of the baby talk words in the data list. This section of the research paper is structured with reference to Jones (1986), pages 178 to 180 in the East Cree Baby talk file. Finally, this paper presents a conclusion of the findings with reference to the chapter 11, First language acquisition, of the text book. Firas is Arabic, and is brought up with Arabian parents and caretaker in the Middle East. This baby talk represents the Arabic language which has been applied from the 19th century. The Arabic language is characterised with numerous examples of baby talk items that display pharyngeal spirants. However, these are commonly seen as elements that are acquired late in Arabic. For example, labial categorical are present in Arabic baby talk and could be the primary categorical to be acquired by the Arabic young children. This is regardless of the fact that they are insignificant at the adult stage. Phonology - entails the study of speech construction in a language, which includes the trend of fundamental speech elements and the established rules of how to pronounce words identified as phonology. The least element of sounds that compose a language is referred to phonemes. In particular, the word â€Å"Mbuwa† which is Firas’s Arabic baby talk word that stands for drink, consists of five phonemes, the â€Å"mb† stands for one phoneme /mb/, the â€Å"u† maps to the short sound/Ã… ­/, the â€Å"w† stands for /w/ and finally, â€Å"a† to its fundamental sound /ÄÆ'/. Morphology - is the advanced stage of language that entails the study of tiny elements of meaning –morphemes. Morphemes entail foundational words, such as, â€Å"Food†, â€Å"dog†